Photographic artist Lorenzo Vitturi discusses his new work with Hunger TV and tells us why Dalston is maintaining its authenticity in the art stakes.

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

My name is Lorenzo Vitturi I am a photographer living and working between London, Milan and Venice. After graduating in photography and graphic design at IED in Rome I received a scholarship at the Benetton Communication Centre, Fabrica. I started out as a cinema set-painter in the movie industry in Rome and I have brought this experience into my photographic projects, which revolve around site-specific installations. I use photography to capture concepts through the manipulation of space, matter and light following every project from creative ideation to realisation. My work has been exhibited in national and international solo and group shows: at Maxxi in Rome, Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris, La Triennale di Milano and Shanghai Art Museum.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

I get inspired about so many things every day, but if I have to choose I can tell you  that I really get inspired by decaying and disappearing worlds and realities. Things that are falling apart but they are still resisting, everything that is just before its end, it could be everything: stories, people or places, organic or inorganic things.
WHAT THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECT OF YOUR ARTWORK – WHAT ARE YOU TRYING TO ACHIEVE?

Even if I consider myself a photographer, as someone who writes with light, in my own practice I am much holistic in my approach to the process leading up to the final image. Playing with the combination of illusion and reality, mixing together different mediums such as photography, sculpture painting and collage I build temporary sets made of all kinds of materials to investigate the effect of passing time on the physical capturing its transformation and decay. The central subject of my research is the ephemerality and transience of life.

WHAT SORT OF PERCEPTION DO YOU THINK PEOPLE HAVE OF YOUR WORK?

Many of my projects are multi layered and can have different interpretations, so every image is just a starting point that can be transformed by the mind of each person experiencing it. In my latest project, A Dalston Anatomy, I did not want to play with meanings that were not in the image itself, I wanted to get closer in process to the art form of music where form and content are one. For this reason I focused on the abstract but universal language of shapes, colours and composition. My aim was to communicate mainly with the emotional side of the spectator and not the rational.

WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON AT THE MOMENT?

At the moment I am finishing a long period project about the Ridley Road Market in Dalston. A unique place in London that is maintaining its authenticity in spite of a surrounding gentrification process. Its community represents perfectly the multicultural nature of Hackney and East London.
During the last year I have been taking pictures, making sculptures and collages with all sort of material I have been finding along the street of the market. The final result will be my first book which hopefully it will come out in November.

WHERE CAN WE SEE YOUR WORK THIS YEAR?

You will see my work at the end of this month from the 23rd of May in Dalston along Ridley Road Market where I am going to present some of the images of the project A Dalston Anatomy. To show it to the public I decided to hang large posters on the walls of Ridley Road to bring the work back to the people, (who might be the most photographed people of the east london yet never see any pictures of themselves). I want to see their reaction and to complete the cycle I opened when I started the project. Additionally I am also presenting a series of photo sculptures at the Fishbar, a gallery in Dalston, which is producing and helping me to realise the entire event.

Art & Culture / Photography