News

Extinction Rebellion protest ban officially declared unlawful

High Court has ruled that last month’s London wide ban on demonstrations was illegal.

It has been announced that the Metropolitan Police imposed ban on Extinction Rebellion protests in the capital was in fact unlawful.

From October 7 last month, XR dedicated ten days to climate change protests, this included shutting down areas around Parliament; the Bank of England; targeting London City Airport and controversially, London Underground during rush hour. The ten-day demonstration caused strain on the police force, and in an attempt to deal with this, The Met imposed a ban on XR protests across the capital, warning those that defy will risk being arrested.

The ban instantly attracted mass criticism nationwide over its disregard of the right to peacefully protest, many members of XR continued to ignore the order and 400 were arrested during this period. Judges of the High Court has now ruled in favour of XR, stating that the police had no power to issue the ban. The Met has since said it would “carefully consider” the ruling. 

Not only does the ruling acknowledge Extinction Rebellion’s fundamental democratic right to peacefully protest and open the city to new climate activism groups, activists now claim it will also mean the hundreds of protestors arrested across the ban could be eligible to sue The Met over a false imprisonment claim.

Green Party member and prominent XR supporter Jenny Jones told The Guardian: “This is a historic win because for the first time we’ve challenged the police on overstepping their powers and we’ve won. It’s great.”

Extinction Rebellion has become a vital vehicle for the UK’s climate activism, every week it gains more members from all walks of life. 

Rankin recently teamed up with XR to create #WhereIsYourPlan, a powerful call to action from climate activists featuring Ellie Goulding, Alex Lawther and Imelda Staunton.

Watch the video below and if you are interested in getting involved with XR visit their website here.

6 November 2019