Art & Culture / Photography

The graduate photographer inspired by traditional Japanese aesthetics

Lottie Wilson’s ethereal and minimalist phototography draws off the Japanese tradition of “wabi-sabi” – the appreciation of beauty in imperfection and transience.

Lottie Wilson’s ethereal and minimalist phototography draws off the Japanese tradition of “wabi-sabi” – the appreciation of beauty in imperfection and transience. “As an artist I believe that the process is as important as the images,” Wilson tells Hunger. “I am constantly re-evaluating my practice and the tradition of “wabi-sabi” allows me to do this without concern.” The University of Brighton graduate specialises in analogue photography and the traditional black and white darkroom process to create a more “thoughtful practice.”

“I’m fascinated by the transience of the everyday and I aim to distil the present in an image,” she says. “My practice is organic – I focus on capturing an emotion rather than an event. Whilst my images appear emotive and raw, I think that my aesthetic is best described as charged.”

For further information, head to lottiewilson.com.

 

4 July 2018

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